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Posts for: October, 2018

By Myers Family Dental
October 30, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: bonding  
3AdvantagesforImprovingYourSmilewithCompositeResins

Are you embarrassed by your front teeth? Maybe it’s just moderate defects—a chipped tooth here, an irregularly shaped tooth there—but it’s enough to make you less confident to smile.

There are a number of ways to transform your teeth’s appearance like porcelain veneers or crowns. But a relatively inexpensive method that’s less involved is to bond dental material called composite resin to your teeth to correct defects. Made of synthetic resins, these restorative materials can mimic your own natural tooth color. We can also artistically shape them to create a more natural look for an irregular tooth.

If you’re looking to change the way your front teeth look, here are 3 reasons to consider composite resins to restore them.

They can be applied in one office visit. Although effective, veneers, crowns and similar restorations are typically outsourced to dental labs for custom fabrication. While the results can be stunning, the process itself can take weeks. By contrast, we can colorize, bond and shape composite resins to your teeth in just one visit: you could gain your “new smile” in just one day.

They don’t require extensive tooth alteration. Many restorations often require tooth structure removal to adequately accommodate them, which can permanently alter the tooth. Thanks to the bonding techniques used with composite resins, we can preserve much more of the existing tooth while still achieving a high degree of artistry and lifelikeness.

Composite resins are stronger than ever. Over the years we’ve learned a lot about how teeth interact with each other to produce the forces occurring during chewing and biting. This knowledge has contributed greatly to the ongoing development of dental materials. As a result, today’s composite resins are better able to handle normal biting forces and last longer than those first developed a few decades ago.

Composite resins may not be suitable for major cosmetic dental problems, but you might still be surprised by their range. To learn if composite resins could benefit your situation—even a large defect—see us for a complete examination.

If you would like more information on composite resin restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth with Composite Resin.”


By Myers Family Dental
October 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
HowtoMaximizeYourChildsDentalHealthPotential

There’s a potential threat lurking in your young child’s mouth—tooth decay. This destructive disease can not only rob them of teeth now, it could also impact their dental health long into their adult years.

That’s why we focus heavily on decay prevention measures even in primary (“baby”) teeth, as well as early treatment should it still occur. It’s a straightforward treatment strategy: minimize the factors that contribute to disease and maximize those that protect against it.

We can represent the disease-causing factors with the acronym BAD. Bad bacteria top the list: they produce oral acid that erodes tooth enamel. Couple that with an Absence of healthy saliva function, necessary for acid neutralization, and you have the potential opening for tooth decay. Poor Dietary habits that include too much added sugar (a prime food source for bacteria) and acidic foods help fuel the decay process.

But there are also SAFE factors that can help counteract the BAD. Promoting better Saliva function helps control acid levels, while Sealants applied to chewing surfaces strengthen these vulnerable areas against decay. We can prescribe Antimicrobials in the form of mouth rinses that reduce abnormally high bacterial concentrations. Fluoride applied directly to the enamel bolsters its mineral content. And an Effective diet high in nutrition and low in sugar or acidic foods rounds out our protective measures.

Promoting SAFE factors greatly reduces the risk of childhood tooth decay. To keep on track it’s important to start regular, six-month dental visits beginning around your child’s first birthday. These visits are the most important way to take advantage of prevention measures like sealants or topical fluoride, as well as keeping an eye out for any signs of decay.

And what you do at home is just as important. Besides providing a teeth-friendly diet, you should also brush and floss your child’s teeth every day, teaching them to do it for themselves when they’re old enough. Playing it “SAFE” with your child’s dental health will help ensure your child’s teeth stay decay-free.

If you would like more information on dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress out of Dentistry for Kids.”


By Myers Family Dental
October 10, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
TreatingGumDiseasearoundToothRootsisHard-butNotImpossible

Periodontal disease may start in the gums’ superficial layers, but it’s not likely to stay there. As the disease moves deeper it can wreak havoc on tooth roots and bone as well as gum tissue attachments. Teeth with multiple roots are in particular peril because of the “forks” called furcations that form where the roots separate from each other. Infected furcations can be very difficult to treat.

We primarily treat gum disease by removing its main source, a thin film of bacteria and food particles called dental plaque that builds up on teeth. To remove it we most often use special hand tools or ultrasonic equipment to vibrate it loose. As the plaque and tartar diminish, the infection begins to wane.

But we can’t be completely successful in stopping the disease if any lingering plaque deposits remain. This especially includes furcations where the infection can cause significant damage to the roots. Although cleaning furcations of plaque can be difficult, it’s not impossible with the aforementioned tools and antimicrobial substances to disinfect the area.

The real problem, though, is access—effectively getting to the furcations to treat them. We may need to perform a surgical procedure called flap surgery where we create a hinged flap in the gum tissue to move it aside and access the root area beneath. Afterward we replace the flap and suture the tissue back in place.

In some cases, the infection may have already caused significant damage to the tissue and underlying bone. We may therefore need to graft gum or bone tissues to these damaged areas to stimulate re-growth. We may also need to surgically reshape the gum attachments around a tooth to make it easier in the future to access and clean the area.

These additional treatments around furcations can be very involved and labor-intensive. That’s why the best outcomes occur if we’re able to start treatment in the early stages of an infection. So, if you notice red, swollen or bleeding gums contact your dentist as soon as possible. Treating gum disease as early as possible will help ensure your tooth roots won’t suffer extensive damage.

If you would like more information on treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “What are Furcations? Branching Tooth Roots can be Periodontal Nightmares.”